BILL BARES and BILLY CARDINE Appearing Mon July 7th 2014 7:30pm


TICKETS         $12 ($6 Students)



Since opening its doors five years ago the White Horse Black Mountain has given jazz a prominent place in its eclectic music offerings. Our newest offering is a monthly series called "Take Two" featuring Bill Bares on piano and a variety of the region's top jazz musicians sharing the stage with Bill in duet format.  This month we present Dr Bill Bares on piano and Billy Cardine on Dobro and other instruments


ABOUT BILLY CARDINE

Billy Cardine is an innovative, genre-blurring slide guitarist, multi-instrumentalist, touring artist, and educator. He has performed at Carnegie Hall, The Kennedy Center, the Ryman Auditorium and major festivals, such as Bonnaroo, Merlefest and Rockygrass. 

He is an internationally featured artist touring in India, Japan, Europe and Canada as well. Billy's dobro playing was recently featured on a Jerry Douglas' production, Southern Filibuster, honoring one of the forefathers of the Dobro. Billy's unique stylings and expertise attracted innovative analog music mogul, Moog Music.

During 2010, he helped Moog design their first electric slide guitar, which he then debuted at MoogFest the following year. Billy’s distinct voice on all things slide has lead him to collaborations with Led Zeppelin's own, John Paul Jones and world renowned, Edgar Meyer in his Porous Borders of Music. Billy's productions have won national and international awards and recognition including Indie Acoustic Music Project’s Roots Album of the Year, Chicago Tribune’s Best Bluegrass records of the year and an Apple iPod Playlist Hot Pick. His memorable compositions and exquisite playing have been featured on The History Channel's "Our Generation", BBC World's "Destination Music", and PBS' "RoadTrip Nation". 




ABOUT BILL BARES

Dr. William Bares holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Amherst College, a Masters degree in Jazz Performance from the University of Miami, and a Ph.D. in ethnomusicology from Harvard University, where he studied with Ingrid Monson, the Quincy Jones Professor of African American Music. Bares spent ten years performing and researching jazz in Europe, and his book Eternal Triangle: American Jazz in European Postmodern is forthcoming with Oxford University Press. Other research interests include jazz and race, and music and environmental issues. Before coming to UNC Asheville, Bares taught at several Boston-based schools, including Harvard University, Brown University, Suffolk University, the New England Conservatory and Berklee College of Music.
After years of additional study and gigging in major jazz centers, Bares and family landed in Asheville, where he and his wife both teach at UNCA. In addition to his teaching, Bares keeps up a busy and varied performance schedule with jazz ensembles of myriad configurations and styles.

ARTIST WEBSITE




ABOUT THE CONCERT SERIES

The "Take Two" Concert Series at White Horse focuses on duets featuring pianist Bill Bares and a rotating cast of the FIRST CLASS regional musicians on their respective instruments. Concerts in the series will take place on the first Monday of each month at 7:30pm. You'll hear a wide variety of unique and amazing music so be sure to mark your calendars for these upcoming concerts in the series.
  • Mar 3 Bill Bares (piano / Jason DeCristofaro (vibraphone)
  • Apr 7 Bill Bares (piano / Rockell Scott (vocals)
  • May 5 Bill Bares (piano / Michael Jefry Stevens (piano)  ** Postponed **
  • Jun 2 Bill Bares (piano / Jonathan Scales (steel drums)
  • July 7 Bill Bares (piano / Billy Cardine (dobro)
  • Aug 4 Bill Bares (pianos / Andy Page (bass)
  • Sept 1 Bill Bares (piano / tba
  • Oct 6 Bill Bares (piano / tba
  • Nov 3 Bill Bares (piano / Lyndsay Pruett (violin)
  • Dec 1 Bill Bares (pianos / tba

From Dr Bill Bares:
First of all, I love the sound and feel of their piano. Second, I felt that a series that puts WNC's A-list jazz musicians out front, alone, with just piano accompaniment, would spotlight their individual artistry in a valuable way. We plan on recording performances and releasing them as a series patterned after Concord's "Live at Maybeck" piano series.
Last, I thought that holding such a series on a Monday at 7:30 would make it noncompetitive with other jazz offerings in the area. That time slot sends the message: "it's all about the music," which I am confident you will find phenomenal. For the roster I have selected area musicians (one different instrument each month) with substantial fan base, individuality and with whom I have a good rapport. I am looking forward to widening this circle in subsequent years.