ROD ABERNETHY and BOB HINKLE Appearing Fri Oct 2nd 2015 at 8pm

$8 in advance
$10 at the door
A reunion of sort as old friends Bob Hinkle and Rod Abernethy share an evening of original songs along with some great songs from others.

Composer and musician Rod Abernethy has been playing in the Carolinas for more than three decades, writing original songs and instrumentals on 6 and 12 string acoustic guitar in the styles of Leo Kottke, Bob Dylan, Tom Waits, Nick Drake and Loudon Wainwright to name a few. He has a strong history in the North Carolina music scene, reaching back to his days as a guitarist, vocalist, and songwriter in well known North Carolina bands including Arrogance (which also included legendary performer and producer Don Dixon), Glass Moon, Rod Dash, The Slackmates and Sixteen Tons. His award winning scores for broadcast and video games have earned him numerous accolades and international success, but these days Rod is getting back to his acoustic roots performing songs that he loves on stages and in clubs around the Carolinas.

Bob Hinkle began his career as a performer while in college at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. He was a member of a trio called The Good Earth and when he and his bandmates graduated they headed straight to New York where a recording contract awaited them with the DynoVoice label. DynoVoice released several recordings of The Good Earth including How Deep Is The Ocean, I Can See A Light, A Funny Thing Happened (Anytime), Must I Really Go Thru This Again, There's More Than One Road To Philadelphia and others.  After a couple years of touring and recording with The Good Earth including serving as the backup band for Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels, Bob released a solo recording of his own entitled Ollie Mogus.   For the next fifteen plus years, Bob Hinkle and Jeb Hart successfully managed the careers of leading pop music starts including: The J. Geils Band, Tom Chapin, Manfred Mann, Naked Eyes, Patti Lupone, Etta James and others.    Seven years ago Bob returned to the WNC mountains to open White Horse Black Mountain.