CATHARSIS (Jazz) Appearing Wed Nov 2nd 2016 at 7:30pm

Tickets:
$10 in advance

$12 at the door


***********
One of The Top Jazz Shows to Visit the Asheville area in quite some time !!!!!
***********



Thirteen years after arriving in New York City, trombonist/composer Ryan Keberle has performed with a jaw-dropping roster of legendary musicians across a vast array of styles. At 34, his resume is more eclectic and impressive than that of many musicians twice his age. Keberle has performed with jazz greats including Maria Schneider and Wynton Marsalis; hip-hop and R&B superstars like Beyonce, Justin Timberlake, and Alicia Keys; Latin jazz leaders like Pedro Giraudo and Ivan Lins; played in the house band at Saturday Night Live, on the soundtracks of filmmakers like Woody Allen, and in the pit for the Tony-winning Broadway musical “In the Heights”; and most recently toured with indie rock ground-breaker Sufjan Stevens, ushering him into a new arena of fresh, emotionally charged music.

Keberle combines that wealth of influence and experience into a bold group sound with the debut of his pianoless quartet, Catharsis. The band comprises some of the most compelling up-and-coming voices in jazz – trumpeter Mike Rodriguez, bassist Jorge Roeder, and drummer Eric Doob – culminating in an approach rich with melodic invention, heavy groove, and a subtle indie rock sensibility. With the absence of a chordal instrument, Keberle was driven to focus more keenly on melodic and rhythmic aspects, resulting in memorable tunes and intensely driving grooves. “I’m very much piano-centric when it comes to arranging and composing,” he explains. “Catharsis pushed me out of that box and forced me to come at the music from more of a contrapuntal perspective. It’s really incredible how versatile these guys are; it was a meeting of the minds from the start.” The band members of Catharsis bring an impressive wealth of experience playing an integral role in many of the top jazz and Latin jazz ensembles including the bands of Charlie Haden, Gary Burton, Julian Lage, Christian Scott, Paquito D’Rivera, and Gonzalo Rubulcaba.




More about Ryan Keberle
Few musicians have managed to navigate the richly varied avenues of New York City’s abundant music scene with the same passion and adaptability as trombonist and composer Ryan Keberle. Since his arrival in 1999, Keberle’s diverse talents have earned him a place alongside a staggering array of legends, superstars, and up-and-coming innovators.

Leading his pianoless quartet Catharsis or arranging for the little big band setting of his Double Quartet, Keberle draws upon lessons learned playing alongside masters of a multitude of forms, from jazz legends to indie rock ground-breakers, R&B superstars to classical virtuosos. That includes playing with jazz greats including Maria Schneider and Wynton Marsalis; hip-hop and R&B superstars like Beyonce, Justin Timberlake, and Alicia Keys; Latin jazz leaders like Pedro Giraudo and Ivan Lins; indie rock ground-breakers such as Sufjan Stevens; or playing in the house band at Saturday Night Live, on the soundtrack of a Woody Allen film, or in the pit for a Tony-winning Broadway musical.
Current Project: Catharsis

Keberle combines that wealth of influence and experience into a bold group sound with the debut of his pianoless quartet, Catharsis. The band comprises some of the most compelling up-and-coming voices in jazz – trumpeter Mike Rodriguez, bassist Jorge Roeder, and drummer Eric Doob – culminating in an approach rich with melodic invention, heavy groove, and a subtle indie rock sensibility. With the absence of a chordal instrument, Keberle was driven to focus more keenly on melodic and rhythmic aspects, resulting in memorable tunes and intensely driving grooves. On their 2013 debut release, Music is Emotion, hailed as a “strong album” by the New York Times, Keberle’s writing for the band reveals his expansive tastes, which encompass Duke Ellington, The Beatles, Sufjan Stevens, and Ravel, among countless others.


Aside from his successful performance career, Mr. Keberle has also developed the reputation as being one of the leading jazz educators in New York City and beyond. In 2001 Mr. Keberle was selected as the artistic director for New York City’s first youth jazz orchestra, Jazz Band Classic. The band made its premiere with Jimmy Heath in Aaron Davis Hall, and finished its season with an appearance by Slide Hampton in Carnegie Hall. Since 2004 Ryan has also directed the burgeoning jazz program at City University’s Hunter College. Other notable teaching credits include frequent improvisation clinics conducted throughout the New York City public school system as part of the American Composer Orchestra’s educational outreach program, guest conducting local school jazz bands and all-region jazz bands, and his own private studio of trombone and improvisation students.











Excerpts from an article in All About Jazz

Ryan Keberle is a musician with open ears, who listens to all kinds of music with the attitude that in most cases something can be learned from it. He listens as a fan and as a musician. It can be just to enjoy rock, alternative, pop, R&B or blues. But there might be a kernel of something that will stick with him, maybe influencing in his gripping and supple trombone solos, or in his writing and arranging.

He plays trombone. But also piano. And he sings. His considerable—and growing— talents extend to writing and arranging. Those are the threads he spins through the loom of his mind and heart that results in the tapestry of his art. It's a tapestry of many colors.

"Other kinds of music are important to me as a listener and as a music fan and as a musician," says Keberle. "A lot of the music I listen to over the years, or the music that's moved me the most, isn't jazz. That's not because I'm not a jazz fan. I love it to death. But I think that's something jazz musicians can learn from. Jazz has the ability to be more emotionally powerful than any other music because of the high quality of musicians, the spontaneity and the depth of personal expression you find in jazz. But often times, that's not the case. I think a lot about that and I use other music—pop music, folk music, Latin music—as guides and models."

.....................While he loves the Catharsis band, he does not compose with the players specifically in mind. As a trained pianist with a classical background, he composes at the piano. "I play pretty melodies and simple chord progressions and grooves and when I play something I like, I pull out my iPhone, hit 'voice record' and set it away." Those melodies might sit for a while because he's so busy as a freelance trombonist and as a teacher at Hunter College in New York City, it might take him a while to return to a song. But, "when it's time to write a new tune for the band, I'll go back. I'll find something that I like. Sometimes it's multiple things I like and I weave it together, create a song. Create the actual composition at that point with the specific instrumentation in mind."

...............It was Keberle's father who started him on trombone, mainly because he often needed one in the college bands he was instructing. So as early as age 14, Keberle was occasionally playing in a college big band. Even if it was somewhat thrust upon him, it wasn't a chore. "I love the trombone. I love what it stands for in history. It's similar to my voice, so I have a natural affinity for the sound and the register. I had a natural affinity for it at a young age. It became easy for me. Typically, anything that comes easy for a kid is fun for a kid as well."

Keberle had started, however, as a classical trombonist, learning all the classical trombone repertoire and playing in all-state groups, and even an all-national orchestra, in high school. His first foray into jazz was the Count Basie band, "a good place to start because it's super swinging, they are all masters of their instruments and the history and the tradition. From there I branched out. I started listening to J.J. Johnson and Slide Hampton a lot."

To flesh out his knowledge of the jazz language, he listened to other instruments and artists like Dexter Gordon, Freddie Hubbard, Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea and Lester Young. "Then I started going back. Louis Armstrong, Coleman Hawkins," Keberle says. "I am still, to this day, trying to completely fathom Charlie Parker. He is so deep. Especially when you hear him where he got to stretch out a little bit. There's a bootleg from Sweden where he got to stretch out on three choruses of 'All the Things You Are.' It's so modern it could be something from yesterday. It's so hip. For me, Charlie Parker is where it's at."

Click HERE to read the full article