UNDERHILL ROSE with Special Guest WOODY WOOD Appearing Fri May 11th 2018 at 8pm

$10 in advance
$12 at the door

“Listen close. Underhill Rose sound like a dress and lipstick-wearing, homespun Southern Simon & Garfunkel.”

"Listening to Underhill Rose‘s new album is like sitting on a shady veranda on a hot summer day with a paddle-fan overhead and a sweaty pitcher of lemonade beside you. It’s that sweet and relaxing."

“Underhill Rose offer distinct vocals and tight harmonies; the common thread is the dusky depth that the ladies share in their vocals.”

Harmonies. Soul-touching lyrics. Eye-catching stage presence. Underhill Rose has become synonymous with beautiful music, charming personalities, and rippling success. In the last four years, the band from Asheville, North Carolina has independently released two albums in the top of the Americana Music Association Airplay Chart and Roots Music Report Chart, all the while garnering critical acclaim from around the globe.

Get to know the joyful soaring voice of Molly Rose and her acoustic guitar and the distinctive styling of Eleanor Underhill’s open-back banjo and salty-blues vocals. Their close harmonies and charisma make most think they are sisters, and with their song-centered original compositions, Underhill Rose creates music that is real and inspired. See them on PBS Television, hear them on nationally-syndicated radio and at live performances, and you will know how Underhill Rose has carved out a distinctive place in the Americana-folk scene.

For their most recent release, the authentic, live sound was captured in their home state over two starry nights. Featuring original songs from their three studio albums, Underhill Rose’s Live covers the depth and joy of nearly a decade of musical partnership. The stripped-down sound highlights the soulful harmonies that originally brought Eleanor and Molly together to play music. By removing the bells and whistles of past recordings, Underhill Rose reveals the fundamental elements of their sound: a powerful partnership in full bloom.

“Underhill Rose cast a decidedly feminine presence on the Americana scene, which is largely male-oriented. ........... Underhill Rose is rooted in bluegrass, folk, and blues, linking them with indelible pop hooks and soulful harmonizing.”

“I was really excited when I found this group because I love the vocals, love the sentiment of the whole album...I think they're brilliant.”

The successful completion of two crowd-funding campaigns raised over $50,000 and freed the group to independently release two noteworthy and charting albums. Their sophomore release, Something Real, peaked at number 18 on the AMA Chart, was named an AMA Top 100 Album of the Year, and claimed a spot in the top 25 of the EuroAmericana Chart, Freeform Americana Radio, and The Alternate Root “Roots 66” charts. In 2015, the band’s tertiary album, The Great Tomorrow, released to wide acclaim, reached the Top 30 of the AMA Airplay Chart once again, and took hold at number 1 on The Roots Music Report’s Progressive Bluegrass Album Chart for over nine weeks. R2 Magazine notes, “The Great Tomorrow is simply top-class country music, seasoned beautifully and seamlessly with earworm hooks and bluesy edges, all delivered with instrumental panache and supremely confident singing.”

Molly Rose and Eleanor Underhill’s friendship is the result of a chance meeting at a makeshift performance of John Prine’s “Angel from Montgomery” between classes at Warren Wilson College. Their affinity for the music they make has kept them together for more than 10 years. Underhill Rose formed in 2009 and has since blossomed into an internationally-recognized band known for blending aspects of Americana, R&B, country, and bluegrass into an authentic sound that is all their own—“Heartfelt Country Soul.” Armed with a fresh sound and an extraordinary ability to blend a multitude of musical genres, Underhill Rose will touch your heart.

 Eleanor Underhill 
– banjo, harmonica, lead vocals, harmonies

Eleanor Underhill grew up surrounded by music. Born in 1981, the same year as MTV’s launch, she was no stranger to the pop icons of the ‘80s and ‘90s. In her formative years, she was often caught re-watching Singing in the Rain, The Sound of Music, and Dirty Dancing—movies that feature strong musical numbers and thus instilled her with a love of word-play, melody, and rhythm. The record player often spun the harmony-laden songs of Simon & Garfunkel, The Beatles, and Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young; Car rides featured Joni Mitchell, Bonnie Raitt, and Barbara Streisand on full blast with her mother singing harmony. Overhearing her mother practicing a repertoire of ballads to perform in the taverns of Colonial Williamsburg also had an impact on Eleanor’s musical interests.

Eleanor played a variety of instruments including piano, trombone, guitar and banjo ukulele, but her discovery of the banjo has defined her sound and image. At 14, she composed her first song and has since written a large catalogue of music that has supported the creation of four albums: Gathering by the Barrel House Mamas, along with Underhill Rose’s self-titled debut, Something Real, an Americana Music Association Top 20 release, and The Great Tomorrow, which was named the #1 Progressive Bluegrass Album by the Roots Music Review. Her unique musical style and prolific writing ability has generated significant attention outside of her bands, as she has won top honors at Asheville’s Songwriting Idol Contest and played on the Grammy Award Winning Song “Mind Over Matter” by Kid-Hop artist, Agent 23 Skidoo. She was also recently named a Deering Banjos endorsing artist.

Eleanor is a graduate of Warren Wilson College in Swannanoa, NC, where she further developed her taste for folk and mountain music. It was there that she learned the intricacies of the claw-hammer banjo style and met her musical partner, Molly Rose. This led to the formation of the regional standout group the Barrel House Mamas. Following a successful run that included an audition for Fox television and a three-year stretch touring the Southeast, the band parted ways. Ultimately, Eleanor and Molly decided to take to the stage as a duo, launching Underhill Rose in 2009. Since its formation, Eleanor has been a major component of the band: cementing its status as a staple in the southern music scene through her unique sound, which is a mesh of folk, jazz, blues, and pop influences. Along with Molly and upright bass player Salley Williamson, she has performed at Bristol Rhythm and Roots, Merlefest, LEAF, Floydfest, Red Ants Pants Festival, and the Warren Hayne’s Christmas Jam.

In May 2011, Underhill Rose released its self-titled, debut album, which was named one of the 2011 top 20 WNCW regional releases. Something Real was released May 2013, landing in the top 25 on six different domestic and international airplay charts. In addition to being played on radio stations around the world, the album peaked at #18 on the Americana Music Association Airplay Chart and remained in the Top 40 for 10 straight weeks. The band’s third independent album, The Great Tomorrow, peaked at #28 on the AMA Chart and hovered at #1 on the Roots Music Review’s Progressive Bluegrass Album Chart for several months.

In addition to her musical accomplishments, Underhill is a thrice-published illustrator and a certified science teacher with a love for gardening and cooking. While not on the road, she teaches kids basic engineering principles at local schools and plays solo or with her side-project, Eleanor Underhill & Friends, around the Asheville area.

Molly Rose 
– guitar, lead vocals, harmonies

Raised in Atlanta, Georgia, Molly Rose is the child of a musical family. Her father is a classically trained musician, her mother sings the blues, and her grandfather was a minister: the perfect combination for raising a performer. Growing up, family gatherings would often feature a musical jam, where everyone would sing and play an instrument. Early on, her grandfather’s small church exposed her to a large amount of singing and performing in front of people, as well.

As a young child, Molly always had a little tune to sing, whether it was practicing imitating her favorite singers or simply coming up with her own. Her abilities developed once she discovered the Linda Ronstadt, Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris fronted group, Trio. Molly was impressed by Ronstadt’s clarity and emotional style of singing and she began to mimic what she heard. That led her to the early development of her subtle, yet powerful sound and ability to hear and sing harmonies off-the-cuff.

A compliment to Molly’s Linda Ronstadt influence was Bonnie Raitt. As she began to discover the blues, Raitt’s music became a regular staple on the playlist because of the emotional vocal style, backed by the slide guitar. At this point, Molly realized that good singing was not about perfection: it was about the emotion coming through the voice(s) in the song. At 17 and a freshman in college, she heard singer-songwriter Gillian Welch and fell in love with her “rootsy” and seemingly simplistic sound. Molly has incorporated that into her music ever since.

With a number of substantial writing credits to her names, she didn’t record her first song, Molly’s New Blues, until she was 21. Her songs are introspective and the heartfelt, personal nature of her writing tends to prolong the writing process as she works on several timeless songs at once.

Molly’s first experience with the guitar was on her mother’s classical guitar at the age of 14. She resisted playing seriously for many years, just learning a few chords here and there to sing songs with friends. But, when her father gave her a guitar for her 18th birthday, it was a natural fit and she dug right in. The time coincided with her move to college and she learned to play with the help of new friends she met there. Many late nights were spent by bonfires in the woods, near a small pond with a great view of the stars, or in a dorm stairwell, where Molly could be found learning to pick out a tune on her guitar and harmonizing with other singers. During this time, she built her stage presence and gained the confidence to step in the lime light.

Her time at Warren Wilson College brought about the formation of the well-known group, the Barrel House Mamas. This band was formed with, among others, Eleanor Underhill. The group garnered a wealth of success and they appeared in states throughout the southeast. The band impressed many audiences, from festival-goers to Fox television executives. After the band folded, Eleanor and Molly maintained their harmonious relationship and created Underhill Rose.

Since forming in 2009, Underhill Rose has appeared throughout the Southeast with special appearances at Floyfest and Merlefest. Their first album was released in May of 2011, featuring many notable songs from Molly, including 2000 Miles and the heart-wrenching track, Bridge. With their second release in 2013, Something Real, Molly had written the sweet love song, Little House, the timeless Drives Me to Drinking, and even some tin-pan alley blues with The End of 27. All of these songs can be heard on radio stations across the country and on Pandora radio.

As her star has risen in the music business, Molly Rose has continued to stay true to herself, while utilizing her talents to impress audiences throughout the Southeast. Her development as an artist has solidified her confidence as a stage performer, singer, songwriter, band member, and guitar player.

When Molly is not performing with Underhill Rose, she appears as a solo performer. She is also an extensive traveler and prefers to seeks out locations where English is a secondary language. If she can’t hop on a plane, you can usually find her in the nearest library, hunting new and old music, in her art studio carving wood blocks for prints, or tending to her vegetable and herb garden. If you ever get the chance to try her pickled okra, you are a lucky person! Her woodcut prints are featured in the album artwork for Something Real and the t-shirt and sticker designs for Underhill Rose. She has a patchwork family of 5 brothers and a sister and is very happy to be involved in the lives of her nieces.